Video: Rotating wings on the butterfly table

Video: Rotating wings on the butterfly table

Here’s the Butterfly Table that I’ve been reproducing. After running the rule joints, I assembled all the parts. I incorporated the rotating wings as proven however they don’t seem to be fastened but. There are dowel joints at each and every finish of the wings and the ones joints don’t seem to be glued. Due to this fact, I will elevate and decrease the wings at this level. Alternatively, they want to be fastened ready that may lead to the wings conserving the drop leaves at the right kind top (this is, the place the wings are flat with the middle best). Additionally, I sought after a solution to accommodate a long run repair for the doweled wing joints. If a dowel had been to damage (now not so most probably, as they’re ash), I sought after some way to take away the wings and refit the dowel joints.

Tim Killen's 17th century butterfly table

Here’s a image with the wings set at a top to create a flat floor throughout the span of the best. But, I nonetheless want a option to repair the ones wings at this optimum top. You’ll see a part of the decrease dowel because it enters the decrease stretcher on the proper. The wing itself does now not trip on the best fringe of the stretcher, reasonably it’s raised off the floor. That is the method it’s on the unique piece. So, I now want to get a hold of a solution to repair this place but permit a long run repair if vital.

Tim Killen's 17th century butterfly table

Here’s the meeting the wrong way up so you’ll be able to see the sockets in the block and the decrease stretcher.

Tim Killen's 17th century butterfly table

Underneath, I’ve proven the wing pressed down on the underside floor of the best leaf.  Then I drove a dowel down via the socket in the decrease stretcher. That socket is a “via” socket. The dowel used to be hammered down till it bottomed out in the wing’s socket. Then I lower the dowel flush with the backside floor of the decrease stretcher. I made a brass plate that covers the socket and dowel-end solving the wing’s up-down place and fighting the wing from losing down.

Tim Killen's 17th century butterfly table

Tim

KillenWOOD


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